Hops

Cascade Hops

Cascade Hops

Cascade hops in pellet form are the most popular in North America due to their versatility. Developed in Oregon in 1972, Cascade hops are a cross between Fuggles hops and the Russian variety Serebrianker

Perle Hops

Perle Hops

Perle Hops are the most commonly used hop in its home country of Germany, but didn't make it to the United States until the 1980's. Currently it is grown in Oregon and Washington. It is considered a dual-purpose hop, since it is very flexible and can be used in combination with other hops as well.

Target Hops

Target Hops

Target hops are an excellent choice when home brewing. Target hops are from England and were bred in 1972 at the Hop Research Institute. This particular hop was created by combining a female northern brewer with a male golding. The flavor is very British and the aroma is very strong. There is an English floral scent to it and has been described as very intense.

Hopsteiner Tettnang Hops

Hopsteiner Tettnang Hops

The Tettnang region in southern Germany is renowned for its prodigious production of quality hops over the last several hundred years. Hopsteiner Tettnang hops are distinguished by their mild, floral aroma and slightly spicy flavor. Most home brewers find that hops from the Tettnang area lend their distinct properties to German ales and lagers.

Fuggles & the Goldings Family

Fuggles & the Goldings Family

Popular throughout Europe, but particularly in the United Kingdom, you can usually detect Fuggles and Goldings hops sitting side-by-side in some of the best known British ales. The Golding hop family contains many varieties all derived from the same stock

Magnum Hops

Magnum Hops

Magnum hops are a clean, slightly citrus tasting hop that provide great flavor for a variety of homebrew beers. Most commonly recommended for IPAs and other strong ales, the Magnum hop variety also works well in some Pilsners and German Lagers.

Hallertauer, Spalt, Saaz & Marynka hops

Hallertauer, Spalt, Saaz & Marynka hops

This loose group of Hallertauer hops, Spalt hops, Saaz hops and Marynka hops are amongst the most widely used ingredient in European, and in particular, Eastern European beers. Including variants of the Hallertauer and Saaz, it would be hard to imagine a German beer or a Pilsner without them.

Northern Brewer Hops

Northern Brewer Hops

Developed in England in 1934, Northern Brewer Hops are grown best in the cooler regions of Europe. It is a similar hop in aroma and flavour to a Hallertau. The aroma of the hop is described as fine, dry, and clean smelling. Northern Brewer hops are most frequently boiled to extract bitterness when brewing American Pale Ales and lagers. They’re known to give the beer an earthy hop character.

Mt. Hood Hops

Mt. Hood Hops

Mt. Hood hops first appeared for homebrew use in early 1989. They take their name from the Oregon Mountain in whose shadow they were developed, although they now grow in Washington and Idaho as well. Hops in general grow in the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with most production coming from the American Pacific Northwest, Germany, and England.

Other Hop Varieties

Other Hop Varieties

There is evidence that the mighty hop was introduced to the United States from England in 1629, but it has been used throughout Europe since the eleventh century to impart flavour, aroma and to help preserve beers.

Hop Rhizomes and Hop Seeds

Hop Rhizomes and Hop Seeds

There can be no better feeling than handing over a cool refreshing beer to one of your friends and knowing that not only was the brew lovingly handcrafted by you, but the ingredients were grown by you as well. With just a small piece of ground, a trellis and a little knowledge, growing your own hops is well within every home brewers capabilities.